One shot to beat all risks: THIS simple diet trick beats heart attack, stroke, high BP risk at once – Times Now

Health
Scientists say that one can rely on safer options like low-sodium salt or rock salt to reduce the risk of severe diseases in the long run

Scientists say that one can rely on safer options like low-sodium salt or rock salt to reduce the risk of severe diseases in the long run.

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New Delhi: At a time when heart diseases have topped the charts for being some of the deadliest killers in the world, several people spend a lot of their time trying to find a way out of it. And this has further intensified since several celebrities lost their life to cardiac ailments such as heart attack, cardiac arrest, or a stroke. While diet and workouts combined can work well in the holistic management of these conditions, there is a simple dietary change that could help improve overall results – it is mitigating salt intake.

How does salt intake affect disease risk?

Doctors and nutritionists have long explained how eating salty foods can be bad for health – the high sodium content in this crucial ingredient is associated with a heightened risk of hypertension or high blood pressure which can raise the odds of suffering a heart attack or a stroke. But is there a way to manage heart diseases better?

On the one hand, it is advised to cut down on salt intake – but what should one use in food alternatively? Scientists say that one can rely on safer options like low-sodium salt or rock salt to reduce the risk of severe diseases in the long run.

A diet high in sodium and low in potassium can raise blood pressure levels. According to research published in Heart journal, salt substitutes can help reduce blood pressure levels by 11 per cent. Additionally, it can lower heart disease risk by 13 per cent and heart attack risk by 11 per cent.

Some of the safest, healthiest salt substitutes are:

  1. Rock salt
  2. Himalayan pink salt
  3. Himalayan black salt
  4. Sea salt

Disclaimer: Tips and suggestions mentioned in the article are for general information purposes only and should not be construed as professional medical advice. Always consult your doctor or a dietician before starting any fitness programme or making any changes to your diet.

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