Top in endocrinology: Traditional Indian medicine and diabetes; bone strength in vegans – Healio

Health

August 10, 2022

1 min read

An ancient medical knowledge system known as Ayurveda reveals information about how to eat well while living with diabetes, according to Parul Kharod, MS, RD, LDN, a registered dietitian and licensed nutritionist practicing in North Carolina.

Kharod recently spoke with Susan Weiner, MS, RDN, CDN, CDCES, FADCES, the column editor for Endocrine Today Diabetes in Real Life, about the key principles of Ayurveda and culinary tips for people who live with diabetes. It was the top story in endocrinology last week.

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Another top story was about a study that showed resistance training was associated with greater bone strength in adults on a vegan diet.

Read these and more top stories in endocrinology below:

What traditional Indian medicine teaches about eating well with diabetes

Weiner talks with Kharod about the ancient medical knowledge system known as Ayurveda and what it can reveal about living with diabetes. Read more.

Resistance training linked to greater bone strength in adults eating a vegan diet

Adults who eat a vegan diet and perform resistance training at least once per week have stronger bone microarchitecture than vegans who do not perform resistance training, according to study findings. Read more.

Eight comorbidity-based subtypes identified for pediatric obesity

Categorizing children with obesity into one of eight subtypes could help providers better understand the condition and may lead to more specialized care, according to study findings published in PLOS Digital Health. Read more.

US sees 30% increase in gestational diabetes over 5 years

From 2016 to 2020, the rate of gestational diabetes rose by 30% among women giving birth in the United States, from 6% in 2016 to 7.8% in 2020, according to data from the National Vital Statistics Reports. Read more.

Genetic susceptibility to COVID-19 may increase risk for hypothyroidism

Adults with a genetic susceptibility to COVID-19 infection may have an increased risk for hypothyroidism, according to findings from a Mendelian randomization published in Thyroid. Read more.

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